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  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    19

    Smile To weld or not to weld

    I've got a 1953 Ford NAA Golden Jubilee with a leaking gas tank. I had it "fixed" about 15 years ago and it's starting to leak again underneath where the mounting bracket is welded / spot welded to it.

    A few questions:

    1. Should I have it fixed again? (it was braised by a tank repair shop.)

    Or

    2. Should I look for a "new" or aftermarket copycat manufactured tank.

    If # 2 does anyone have know of a source for a tank?

  2. #2
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    31

    My opinion

    Your last repair lasted for 15 years? Thats a long time, I would do it again

  3. #3

    RE: To weld or not to weld

    I would probably have it fixed again if the majority of the metal except where the leak is is sound.

  4. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    31
    They make liquid coatings for tanks.. though i'd prefer soldering or brazing to fix it.

    As for a replacement.. there is a NAA/HUNDRED/THOUSAND series universal tank that will fit from CNH.

    here is one from people I've bought from before.. in fact.. half my fords have parts from these guys..

    Just 8N's

    NAA 9002D Fuel Tank Assembly( Includes NAA99072-A Rear Support Bracket Assy.) 1953-64 $191.00

    I've also bought dozens of parts from these guys:

    Restoration Supply Ford Tractor Parts

    Ford NAA, 600; can also be used on 800, 900, 601, 701, 801, 901, 2000, 4000 to 1964 but smaller capacity No opening for sending unit. Fuel tank $249.00

    Can't forget these guys either... ( I have bought parts from all these people.. NO BAD results.. )

    Discount Tractor Parts and Manuals for Older and Antique Tractors

    Fuel Tank - For NAA, Jubilee 1953-54; 600, 700, 800, 900 1955 - 57 (Not For diesel) Gasoline Fuel Tank, 11 gallon, No opening for sending unit. Tank has two threaded openings in bottom for fuel outlet, center and outer edge. (fuel line must be modified) (Part No: NAA600800G) $183.35

    Hope this helps..

    Also.. keep in mind.. most if not all of these listed are the 53-64 'multi' tanks, meaning they have the threaded fuel port for the NAA, but also have the flat 'boss' for the 2 screw fuel tap for the hundred and thousand series.

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    19

    Thanks

    Thank you all for the responses and the links.

    Mikey - I really appreciate the detailed information.
    In your experience with with the older tanks what would you do - repair again or replace? There is no rust in the tank. I think the failure was caused by stress & vibration it's cracked along the bottom of the tank where there is a mounting bracket attached to the tank. There is cracked braze all along four sides of the bracket. For 183.35. it might be worth it provided the new tank will last. The OEM tank lasted ~ 40 years the repair lasted ~15. So I am leaning on replacement.

    The flat 'Boss' you mentioned - is there something I will have to fabricate to plug that?

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    31
    If you are not good with brazing or soldering, then the replacement tank would be my choice over a chemical sealer.

    I have a 1955 660 with a replacement tank.. and it doesn't detract from the looks.

    I've seen a couple-3 different tank designs, depending on the country of manufacturer.

    On some, the oem threaded hole that the NAA used is present, and the spot the hundred series tap was screwed to, is merly a flattened boss with a dimple imprint so you can line it up and drill your own holes. I've also seen one that had the NAA threaded hole, and a set of holes at the hundred series location, that you used a blank plate and orings to seal off, and again.. I've seen a third setup that had 2 threaded holes.. one where the NAA tap was, and another where the hundred seris tap was.. obviously meaning you needed to use a threaded NAA fuel tap in the secondary spot even if you had a hundred series.. thus meaning you may need to modify the fuel line or connections.

    If threaded holes, it is a tapered thread... should be easy to plug.

    The flat boss area, ironically.. ford used short sheet metal screws to hold the tap on.. thus.. there were lots of leaks on those taps. I believe a suitable blank-off plate could be fashioned and soldered on.. or screwed on and using 3 orings to seal, pretty easilly... just remember to get fuel rated rings.. or nitrile.. not plain rubber..

    If it were me.. I'd look at just 8n's with the 191$ tank with brackets, or the 183$ tank from restoration supply. it doesn't mention brackets.. however it says that it has 2 threaded openings.. meaning it will be easy to plug with a tapered thread plug and some fuel rated thread paste..

  7. #7
    Radiator shops also do these type repairs. If one is near you couldn't hurt to check price. Is there some way you could put a piece of rubber between where mount attaches to frame/tranny/what-ever it attaches to for a vibration damper? I would check into this if I just got repair or new.

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